Tcdn
Posts: 211
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:52 pm

Re: Can drivers take on driverless cabs

Thu Sep 15, 2016 5:43 am

with the whirlwind of self-driving vehicles coming out it's good to see that many automakers are deciding to take it a bit slower now and make sure the vehicles can live up to their name

sam
Posts: 214
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:47 pm

Re: Can drivers take on driverless cabs

Thu Sep 15, 2016 4:18 pm

Sinapore has self driving taxis on the road now - not sure I am comfortable with this yet

[quoteSINGAPORE — The world’s first self-driving taxis began picking up passengers in Singapore starting Thursday.

Select members of the public can hail a free ride through their smartphones in taxis operated by nuTonomy, an autonomous vehicle software startup. While multiple companies, including Google and Volvo, have been testing self-driving cars on public roads for several years, nuTonomy says is the first to offer rides to the public.

Its launch in Singapore is beating ride-hailing service Uber, which plans to offer rides in autonomous cars in Pittsburgh, by a few weeks.

NuTonomy is starting small — six cars now, growing to a dozen by the end of the year. The ultimate goal, company executives say, is to have a fully self-driving taxi fleet in Singapore by 2018, to help cut the number of cars on Singapore’s congested roads. Eventually, the model could be adopted in cities around the world, nuTonomy hopes.] [/quote]

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/the-r ... -singapore

sam
Posts: 214
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:47 pm

Re: Can drivers take on driverless cabs

Thu Sep 15, 2016 4:21 pm

I wonder how vehicle insurance for liablility and personal injury will change with self driving vehicles? I totally embrace Ford's take on autonomous cars

DEARBORN, Mich. — Raj Nair, the development chief leading Ford Motor’s effort to build self-driving cars, concedes that he does not know what caused the fatal May accident in which the driver of a Tesla Model S sedan, operating in Autopilot mode, crashed into a tractor-trailer crossing a roadway in Florida.

But Mr. Nair has given considerable thought to the circumstances — a truck turning left into traffic and a partially automated vehicle traveling at highway speed, leaving little room for miscalculation. He has pictured the car’s camera looking ahead and struggling to make out a white truck against an overcast sky, its forward-looking radar beam possibly shooting under the truck’s trailer.

The conclusion he has drawn: The current state of even semiautonomous driving technology isn’t quite ready to take on such a complex traffic situation. That is why Ford, which on Monday demonstrated its own approach to self-driving vehicles, said it was convinced by its decade of research to take a go-slow approach.



http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/13/busin ... s-car.html

sam
Posts: 214
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:47 pm

Re: Can drivers take on driverless cabs

Thu Sep 15, 2016 4:25 pm

Ok last one on this - Tesla says its boosting autopilot by improving radar tech. I think the self driving technology may be ready before us humans are going to trust it -or maybe I am just the minority in this thought

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/tesla ... -1.3758277

voltage
Posts: 138
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2016 8:09 pm

Re: Can drivers take on driverless cabs

Thu Sep 15, 2016 5:57 pm

sam wrote:I wonder how vehicle insurance for liablility and personal injury will change with self driving vehicles? I totally embrace Ford's take on autonomous cars

DEARBORN, Mich. — Raj Nair, the development chief leading Ford Motor’s effort to build self-driving cars, concedes that he does not know what caused the fatal May accident in which the driver of a Tesla Model S sedan, operating in Autopilot mode, crashed into a tractor-trailer crossing a roadway in Florida.

But Mr. Nair has given considerable thought to the circumstances — a truck turning left into traffic and a partially automated vehicle traveling at highway speed, leaving little room for miscalculation. He has pictured the car’s camera looking ahead and struggling to make out a white truck against an overcast sky, its forward-looking radar beam possibly shooting under the truck’s trailer.

The conclusion he has drawn: The current state of even semiautonomous driving technology isn’t quite ready to take on such a complex traffic situation. That is why Ford, which on Monday demonstrated its own approach to self-driving vehicles, said it was convinced by its decade of research to take a go-slow approach.



http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/13/busin ... s-car.html


So how does this go - no more cab drivers - Capatalism at its coldest!

Tcdn
Posts: 211
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:52 pm

Re: Can drivers take on driverless cabs

Fri Sep 16, 2016 3:11 am

I don't know how I feel about getting into a driverless vehicle
http://www.recode.net/2016/9/14/1291743 ... ivers-cars


As Uber’s robot cars hit the streets in Pittsburgh, the fears of its human drivers have become a reality

"...The ride-hailing Uber customers can now hail a self-driving Uber in Pittsburgh.

Uber CEO and co-founder Travis Kalanick predicted in 2014 in an interview at the Code conference that the end of human drivers was eventually going to arrive.

“And when those bad boys are made, look, the way to think about it, the magic of self-driving vehicles, is that the reason Uber [is] expensive is because you’re not just paying for the car, you’re paying for the other dude in the car,” said Kalanick, in a moment of bare-knuckles candor. “And so, when there’s no other dude in the car the cost of taking an Uber anywhere becomes cheaper than owning a vehicle ... And of course that means safer rides, that means more environmentally friendly, that means a lot of things.”

“Look, this is the way the world is going,” Kalanick said, answering how he might explain it to Uber drivers who might lose their jobs down the road. “The world isn’t always great.”


Two years later those robot cars are now deployed by Uber on the road in Pennsylvania.

It’s still not as futuristic as all that, though. Hailing a self-driving Uber is still a lot like hailing a regular Uber at the moment, although it’s only available to Uber’s most “loyal” customers at first. If a self-driving car is available when one of these customers hails an UberX, they will be greeted by a car with close to two dozen cameras and sensors, along with one engineer and one “safety driver” in the front seats. Customers input their destination, the car drives itself there, with the safety driver only taking over if the system needs it to.

While this is the big and potentially scary moment, to be sure, a lot still has to happen before Uber drivers become completely obsolete. Such as: Self-driving cars have to become legal to drive without a safety driver; users will have to want to get in a self-driving Uber; and, perhaps most importantly, Uber will have to buy and trick out enough cars with self-driving technology to make it worth the investment.

What’s most striking about the effort, though, is that it is probably the first time that Uber will actually own physical assets.

Presumably, if initial efforts work, Uber will continue to buy cars and retrofit them with its own self-driving technology as the company ramps up its fleet of driverless cars. Whether it’s from Volvo or another automaker, Uber will likely have to buy, maintain and insure its own cars...."

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