laev
Posts: 146
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2016 8:10 pm

Googles flying cars

Mon Aug 22, 2016 7:03 pm


laev
Posts: 146
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2016 8:10 pm

Re: Googles flying cars

Mon Aug 22, 2016 7:07 pm

Flying cars n trapping humans like fly's. :)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2 ... riverless/

jimmyjon
Posts: 145
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2016 8:08 pm

Re: Googles flying cars

Thu Aug 25, 2016 2:47 am

O-M-G. Lol

sam
Posts: 213
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:47 pm

Re: Googles flying cars

Thu Aug 25, 2016 2:52 am

I will believe it when I see it

aidan
Posts: 157
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:46 pm

Re: Googles flying cars

Fri Aug 26, 2016 3:15 am

Sorting out the logistics of this is overwhelming - flying cars.. give me a break :lol:

aidan
Posts: 157
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:46 pm

Re: Googles flying cars

Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:32 am

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/24/tech ... pe=article

CLEARLAKE, Calif. — On a recent afternoon, an aerospace engineer working for a small Silicon Valley company called Kitty Hawk piloted a flying car above a scenic lake about 100 miles north of San Francisco.

Kitty Hawk’s flying car, if you insisted on calling it a “car,” looked like something Luke Skywalker would have built out of spare parts. It was an open-seated, 220-pound contraption with room for one person, powered by eight battery-powered propellers that howled as loudly as a speedboat.

The tech industry, as we are often told, is fond of disrupting things, and lately the automakers have been a big target. Cars that use artificial intelligence to drive themselves, for example, have been in development for a few years and can be spotted on roads in a number of cities. And now, coming onto the radar screen, are flying machines that do not exactly look like your father’s Buick with wings.

More than a dozen start-ups backed by deep-pocketed industry figures like Larry Page, a Google founder — along with big aerospace firms like Airbus, the ride-hailing company Uber and even the government of Dubai — are taking on the dream of the flying car.

The approaches by the different companies vary and the realization of their competing visions seems far in the future, but they have one thing in common: a belief that one day regular people should be able to fly their own vehicles around town.

Continue reading the main story
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TECHNOLOGY By KITTY HAWK 00:39
A Flying Car Prototype From Silicon Valley
Video
A Flying Car Prototype From Silicon Valley
Kitty Hawk, a Silicon Valley company backed by Larry Page, a Google founder, began testing a prototype over a lake in Northern California. By KITTY HAWK on Publish Date April 24, 2017. . Watch in Times Video »
Embed
ShareTweet
“I love the idea of being able to go out into my backyard and hop into my flying car,” said Brad Templeton, a Silicon Valley entrepreneur who has served as a consultant on Google’s self-driving project. “I hate the idea of my next-door neighbor having one.”

Kitty Hawk, the company backed by Mr. Page, is trying to be one of the first out of the gate and plans to start selling its vehicle by the end of the year.

The company has attracted intense interest because of Mr. Page and its chief executive, Sebastian Thrun, an influential technologist and self-driving car pioneer who is the founding director of Google’s X lab.

In 2013, Zee Aero, a Kitty Hawk division, became the object of Silicon Valley rumors when reports of a small air taxilike vehicle first surfaced.

Mr. Page declined a request for an interview but said in a statement: “We’ve all had dreams of flying effortlessly. I’m excited that one day very soon I’ll be able to climb onto my Kitty Hawk Flyer for a quick and easy personal flight.”

During his recent test flight, Cameron Robertson, the aerospace engineer, used two joysticklike controls to swing the vehicle back and forth above Clear Lake, sliding on the air as a Formula One car might shimmy through a racecourse. The flight, just 15 feet above the water, circled over the lake about 20 or 30 yards from shore, and after about five minutes Mr. Robertson steered back to a floating landing pad at the end of a dock.

The Kitty Hawk Flyer is one of several prototypes the start-up, based in Mountain View, Calif., is designing. The company hopes to create an audience of enthusiasts and hobbyists, who can pay $100 to sign up for a $2,000 discount on the retail price of a Flyer to “gain exclusive access to Kitty Hawk experiences and demonstrations where a select few will get the chance to ride the Flyer.”


It is here to see now lol

[url] CLEARLAKE, Calif. — On a recent afternoon, an aerospace engineer working for a small Silicon Valley company called Kitty Hawk piloted a flying car above a scenic lake about 100 miles north of San Francisco.

Kitty Hawk’s flying car, if you insisted on calling it a “car,” looked like something Luke Skywalker would have built out of spare parts. It was an open-seated, 220-pound contraption with room for one person, powered by eight battery-powered propellers that howled as loudly as a speedboat.

The tech industry, as we are often told, is fond of disrupting things, and lately the automakers have been a big target. Cars that use artificial intelligence to drive themselves, for example, have been in development for a few years and can be spotted on roads in a number of cities. And now, coming onto the radar screen, are flying machines that do not exactly look like your father’s Buick with wings.

More than a dozen start-ups backed by deep-pocketed industry figures like Larry Page, a Google founder — along with big aerospace firms like Airbus, the ride-hailing company Uber and even the government of Dubai — are taking on the dream of the flying car.

The approaches by the different companies vary and the realization of their competing visions seems far in the future, but they have one thing in common: a belief that one day regular people should be able to fly their own vehicles around town.

Continue reading the main story
RELATED COVERAGE


Intel Buys Mobileye in $15.3 Billion Bid to Lead Self-Driving Car Market MARCH 13, 2017

A Lawsuit Against Uber Highlights the Rush to Conquer Driverless Cars FEB. 24, 2017

SMARTER THAN YOU THINK
Google Cars Drive Themselves, in Traffic OCT. 9, 2010
Tech and Society
The Education of Ellen Pao
SEP 19
Chips Off the Old Block: Computers Are Taking Design Cues From Human Brains
SEP 16
Lurid Lawsuit’s Quiet End Leaves Silicon Valley Start-Up Barely Dented
SEP 15
Finding a More Inclusive Vision of Fitness in Our Feeds
JUL 6
Can a Tech Start-Up Successfully Educate Children in the Developing World?
JUN 27
See More »

There are challenges, no doubt, with both the technology and government regulations. Perhaps the biggest hurdle will be convincing the public that the whole idea isn’t crazy.


TECHNOLOGY By KITTY HAWK 00:39
A Flying Car Prototype From Silicon Valley
Video
A Flying Car Prototype From Silicon Valley
Kitty Hawk, a Silicon Valley company backed by Larry Page, a Google founder, began testing a prototype over a lake in Northern California. By KITTY HAWK on Publish Date April 24, 2017. . Watch in Times Video »
Embed
ShareTweet
“I love the idea of being able to go out into my backyard and hop into my flying car,” said Brad Templeton, a Silicon Valley entrepreneur who has served as a consultant on Google’s self-driving project. “I hate the idea of my next-door neighbor having one.”

Kitty Hawk, the company backed by Mr. Page, is trying to be one of the first out of the gate and plans to start selling its vehicle by the end of the year.

The company has attracted intense interest because of Mr. Page and its chief executive, Sebastian Thrun, an influential technologist and self-driving car pioneer who is the founding director of Google’s X lab.

In 2013, Zee Aero, a Kitty Hawk division, became the object of Silicon Valley rumors when reports of a small air taxilike vehicle first surfaced.

Mr. Page declined a request for an interview but said in a statement: “We’ve all had dreams of flying effortlessly. I’m excited that one day very soon I’ll be able to climb onto my Kitty Hawk Flyer for a quick and easy personal flight.”

During his recent test flight, Cameron Robertson, the aerospace engineer, used two joysticklike controls to swing the vehicle back and forth above Clear Lake, sliding on the air as a Formula One car might shimmy through a racecourse. The flight, just 15 feet above the water, circled over the lake about 20 or 30 yards from shore, and after about five minutes Mr. Robertson steered back to a floating landing pad at the end of a dock.

The Kitty Hawk Flyer is one of several prototypes the start-up, based in Mountain View, Calif., is designing. The company hopes to create an audience of enthusiasts and hobbyists, who can pay $100 to sign up for a $2,000 discount on the retail price of a Flyer to “gain exclusive access to Kitty Hawk experiences and demonstrations where a select few will get the chance to ride the Flyer.” [/url]

aidan
Posts: 157
Joined: Sat Jul 09, 2016 1:46 pm

Re: Googles flying cars

Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:33 am

ginforce wrote:Lilium, a Flying Car Start-Up, Raises $90 Million https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/05/busi ... g-car.html

Image

LONDON — As interest in flying cars continues to swell, one of the most prominent start-ups working on the technology has gained a big new backer.

Lilium Aviation, a German company that held a successful test flight of the Eagle, its two-seat electric jet, at its Munich base this year, announced on Tuesday that it has raised $90 million in a new round of financing.

The investment was led by Tencent Holdings, the Chinese internet giant. Other investors in the round included LGT, the investment vehicle of Lichtenstein’s royal family; Atomico, the venture firm run by a founder of Skype, Niklas Zennstrom; and Obvious Ventures, the investment firm co-founded by the Twitter co-founder Evan Williams. Mr. Zennstrom has previously invested in the company.

Lilium is among several companies looking to usher in an era of Jetsons-type flying cars, including those backed by the Google co-founder Larry Page, Uber and Airbus. But the two-year-old company is trying to stand out by focusing on an electric jet — unlike other models that effectively function more like hovercraft.

Continue reading the main story
RELATED COVERAGE


No Longer a Dream: Silicon Valley Takes On the Flying Car APRIL 24, 2017
The design, by the four graduates of the Technical University of Munich who founded Lilium, is meant to be more energy efficient than competitors’ models. As the start-up demonstrated with its Eagle in April, Lilium’s vehicle is designed to take off and land vertically, like a helicopter.


Video by Lilium
Lilium is also working on a bigger, five-seat version of what it calls an “air taxi” that could ferry passengers or cargo as far as 300 kilometers, or 186 miles, and reach a maximum speed of 300 kilometers an hour.

“We have highly congested cities where we can do things to improve matters,” Remo Gerber, Lilium’s chief commercial officer, said. He and his colleagues envision a fleet of air taxis zipping across crowded cities, once the vehicles are created and approved by the various regulators, of course.

“We’re trying to move from a niche transport vehicle to a mass-transport one,” he added.

That has obvious appeal to Tencent: Its e-commerce empire could benefit from making such air transport a reality.

“From underdeveloped regions with poor road infrastructure, to the developed world with traffic congestion and sprawl, new possibilities emerge when convenient daily flight becomes an option for all of us,” David Wallerstein, Tencent’s chief exploration officer, said in a statement.

The cash infusion from Tencent and other investors will help accelerate that work, and allow Lilium to expand beyond its team of roughly 70 employees, Mr. Gerber said.

Get out!!! this is too funny plus the 90 million start up is killing me - so at the same time we are going to thrust upon the general public self driving cars and flying cars hahahaha God help us lol


Check this one out!!!!!


jimmyjon
Posts: 145
Joined: Tue Aug 09, 2016 8:08 pm

Re: Googles flying cars

Thu Sep 28, 2017 4:00 am

Holy Batman these flying cars are really going to come to fruition in my lifetime I cannot believe it

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